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  • Shashank Kela: Some notes on the ecological crisis in India – Ecologise
    imperial officials has always been just that a myth A plethora of studies confirm what can be deduced by the experience of living in a caste village or small town for any length of time the interests of one s neighbours don t matter unless they happen to belong to the same caste Group affiliation is the true marker of economic and social co operation and this is true the higher up the social hierarchy one goes There is nothing more absurd than the binary opposition of Bharat and India for the dominant farming castes have long treated land more or less like a unit of capital and agriculture as a springboard for accumulation and investment One reason why pre modern irrigation systems collapsed so quickly is because they were maintained by the forced labour of Dalits The breakdown of traditional systems of labour management and control in the countryside though far from complete must be reckoned as an unmixed blessing What is striking is that no alternative systems of repair and maintenance were or could be devised instead farmers turned enthusiastically to canal irrigation and borewells And perhaps the reason why the poisoning of soil and water meets with such universal indifference is that the impacts are differentially experienced the felt interests of those who happen to occupy a neighbourhood or settlement rarely coincide 2 The time honored way of discussing ecological issues followed thus far is to quantify their human impacts as though we were the only species who matter or that other species whether animate or not matter insofar as their existence is related to our well being Thus bees matter because they pollinate crops the health of the oceans matters because it affects fish stocks forests matter because they sequester carbon dioxide climate change matters because it affects the weather to which we must adapt and so on ad infinitum This kind of anthropocentricism is ugly but hard to avoid It has even spawned a branch of ecology called ecosystem services dedicated to quantifying the manifold ways in which the environment supports our well being productivity etc It is worth pointing out that by the time the human impact of any environmental problem becomes visible its effects on other living organisms are likely to be considerable Apart from this there are actions that cause no particular damage to us or only what is considered permissible in relation to their economic benefit but whose effects on other forms of life can be crippling Organochlorine pesticides affect a range of organisms including raptors at the top of the food chain An anti inflammatory drug widely used by farmers to treat livestock has driven three previously common species of Gyps vultures to the verge of extinction At the other end of the spectrum it is clear that whenever a sufficiently large number of living organisms are affected human impacts must follow as night follows day This is true of the current rate of species extinction which points to levels of ecological stress that are already affecting us Today amphibians enjoy the dubious distinction of being the world s most endangered class of animals it s been calculated that the group s extinction rate could be as much as forty five thousand times higher than the background rate But extinction rates among many other groups are approaching amphibian levels It is estimated that one third of all reef building corals a third of all freshwater mollusks a third of sharks and rays a quarter of all mammals a fifth of all reptiles and a sixth of all birds are headed toward oblivion The losses are occurring all over in the South Pacific and the North Atlantic in the Arctic and the Sahel in lakes and on islands on mountaintops and in valleys 2 The difficulty is in relating the first order of impacts minuscule or none to the last severe It is a series of ostensibly innocuous local actions whose impacts seem minimal and economic benefit obvious clearing forest intensified application of fertilizers and pesticides overfishing burning fossil fuels to generate electricity building dams and so on which cumulatively add up to produce an intractable problem In India habitat loss has already reached levels well beyond the alarming Our near shore seas have been despoiled by trawler fishing a technique that involves scraping the seabed killing far more organisms than fish actually caught If the crisis of overfishing is a global one India s over exploitation ranking remains far worse than the global average 3 Our major rivers no longer exist as rivers except where snowmelt maintains a perennial flow meanwhile sand mining destroys what is left of their habitats The Ganga s fishery is dying strangled by the Farraka Barrage and dams on its main stem and tributaries the river dolphin seems set on a spiral of extinction there are fewer and fewer stretches of the river where they can live and feed without getting entangled in fishing nets The Deccan s grasslands have been overgrazed and built over The rainforests of the Western Ghats like all tropical mountain chains a hotbed of diversity have been reduced to patches from where new species of frogs and insects are still being discovered Large swathes have been overrun by invasive exotics like lantana introduced during the colonial period The fragile ecology of the eastern Himalayas is threatened by dam building The examples of short sightedness greed and waste could be multiplied endlessly Set against this narrative of devastation is the emergence of an independent conservation movement which in turn reflects a gradual rise in environmental awareness amongst a tiny fraction of the middle class There are more birders and butterfly watchers more wildlife photographers more aspiring ecologists independent conservation organizations like the Nature Conservation Foundation and the Wildlife Conservation Society English language newspapers carry more environmental stories there are nature clubs in many cities and the preservation of tree cover in urban environments the Delhi Ridge the IIT campus in Chennai is the subject of organized if intermittent campaigns It would be easy to overemphasize this phenomenon the truth is that environmental consciousness despite the passage of time and ink spilled since Chipko and Silent Valley remains nascent fractured and in reach minuscule Ecological considerations remain notably absent from the discourse of the organized left and more importantly of progressive broadly left leaning intellectuals environmental issues are rarely discussed in Kafila for example Moreover the range of issues and movements to which the term environmental is applied obfuscates more than it clarifies Since the turn of the century there has been a noticeable spike in ecological research and a lively debate on the science and practice of conservation Its importance lies in connections sought to be made with wider issues and perspectives matched by a near total lack of dialogue with groups and organizations who might conceivably be enlisted in the cause of conservation This paradox as we shall see is not the fault of conservationists alone but a symptom of the general deafness that afflicts politics on every plane Amongst ecologists a sharp difference exists between those who subscribe to what has been called the fences and fines approach the strict policing of protected areas and the exclusion of human activity from them and those who advocate a more inclusive landscape centered paradigm one that supports protected areas but looks beyond them to the wider landscapes of which they form part to engage with people living in these landscapes the problems of poverty and social justice and seek their consent however grudging to conservation goals on pragmatic grounds 4 This view holds that an exclusionary approach to conservation will not work in the long run and is unlikely to meet important conservation goals either Intellectually the proponents of participatory conservation have the best of the argument It seems eminently sensible to suggest that one should look beyond protected areas if for no other reason than that many species consistently overflow their boundaries The wider landscape must be taken into account and here it is futile to talk only of forest corridors or treat them as a technical problem requiring much the same solutions Human pressures on reserved forests are of a different order and magnitude to those on protected areas and require a more nuanced approach Nor is it only or even primarily a matter of forests Tigers leopards elephants and wolves move across cultivated landscapes in riverine and marine environments the very notion of a physical boundary becomes absurd If conservation is to move beyond a few flagship species human use must be reconciled and reoriented towards conservation goals to a greater or smaller extent Participatory conservation embodies the recognition that conservation for its own sake must be combined with a utilitarian appeal to the interests of the poor in order to be effective the difficulty lies in finding this common ground Meanwhile the state faithfully echoes the viewpoint of exclusionary conservationists with the key difference that it obdurately refuses to allow scientific expertise to inform its operations The true extent of forest cover in India remains a matter of educated guesswork because official data makes no distinction between trees and forests or indeed between different kinds of forests less managed and more those where timber trees such as teak are still planted and those where forestry operations have been abandoned The problem of nature conservation starts with the forest department a fact most ecologists are loath to recognize Deeply authoritarian and undemocratic chronically understaffed its field staff badly trained and badly treated and prone to corruption and abuse of power it has historically been an agency dedicated less to protecting forests than generating revenue from them Nor is this solely a colonial legacy forestry operations which alter the composition of natural forests by planting commercially valuable trees and logging were amongst its major remits as late as the 1980s in the end judicial intervention was needed to scale them down Ecological science in India has always been circumscribed by the department s power to grant or withhold access though the situation is better now it remains reluctant to allow any meaningful role to independent scientists even Indian ones witness Ullas Karanth s critique of its latest method of counting tigers The state s refusal to engage local communities in dialogue ensures their hostility to protected areas poaching grazing and wood collection are symptoms of this covert war All the forest department can do is attenuate it through punitive action Participatory conservationists must work with it while seeking to overturn this pattern of hostility The experiments are few and far between a project in the high Himalayas that works with local communities persuading them to set aside part of their commons for wild ungulates in return for an annual payment made into the village fund The results are promising local populations of bharal and ibex the natural prey of snow leopards have increased as a result rates of predation on domestic livestock have gone down The basic idea to increase the natural prey base of this unique predator and diminish the hostility of local communities towards it seems workable In the Valparai plateau of Tamil Nadu conservationists work with plantation companies in order to restore rainforest fragments on their lands and replace exotic shade trees with native varieties The idea is that these restored fragments will act as corridors for a variety of animals moving between surrounding forests and increase species diversity This project is dependent upon corporate goodwill the returns for the companies involved come principally in the form of positive publicity arguably its most important result has been an innovative system of emergency lights SMS alerts and TV broadcasts to warn local people of elephant movements minimizing the possibility of potentially fatal encounters Another project works in the densely cultivated landscape of western UP where patches of wetlands set amidst fields and maintained primarily for fodder play host to a large population of sarus cranes The goal is to understand the mechanism whereby farmers allow these birds to coexist and identify potential threats with the aim of staving them off 5 Yet another NCF project in Arunachal Pradesh employs a team of local watchers paid a small wage to guard and monitor hornbill nests in community forests around the Pakke Tiger Reserve Each of these projects has a hard conservation component in terms of research or protection or both Apart from this there are any number of tourism based initiatives whose goal is to provide local communities with a tangible stake in conservation Yet these experiments valuable though they are are only a tiny fraction of what should be possible in a country of India s size and diversity One reason is that the participatory conservation movement such as it is is still in its infancy Another stems from the lack of dialogue with groups that might have interests in common adivasi organizations for example The inherent conflict between the right to use natural resources and the goal of conserving them did not prevent some conservationists from welcoming the passage of the Forest Rights Act Yet the two sets of actors continue to talk past each other Adivasi organizations take the position that adivasi use of forests is sustainable because based on a traditional corpus of knowledge without bothering to reflect that these practices may have broken down or become irrelevant in altered ecological circumstances Conservationists tend to ignore a long history of dispossession and environmental devastation caused by the state it makes little sense to blame local communities for deforestation without recognizing the nature of their alienation and its causes Adivasi movements present an idealized unitary picture of adivasi traditions pasts and futures The reality as always is more complex and messy Most adivasi communities contain more than a few members who see education as a gateway to a very different kind of life one of white collar jobs and urban occupations In other words they do not see their future as being on the land There are other communities who continue to measure their future in terms of the traditional forest based economy Given the fact that forests are now a scarce resource of much more than local value their future cannot be decided by local communities on local considerations alone This is if you like the theoretical or philosophical argument Besides state ownership of forests goes back more than a century and a half now and there is little possibility of this changing either on ideological or pragmatic grounds The best that can be done is to reform forest management giving local communities a real voice in the process Since it is evident that traditional methods are no longer sufficient to ensure sustainability it makes sense to figure out ways of reconciling subsistence use with conservation in specific contexts There are after all more reserve forests than protected areas in India and it is preferable that these be managed co operatively than destroyed wholesale by mining dams and the like Another problem pertains to wider questions of economic policy Exclusionary conservation can afford to ignore these by fighting specific threats on a case by case basis Insofar as participatory conservation seeks to tackle the landscape as a whole its proponents must confront the question and nature of economic growth It is true that ecologists alone can hardly suggest a solution to the impasse created by an economic system predicated on infinite growth and rising levels of consumption Over two and half centuries we have reshaped nature in the way that no species before us had the capacity to do condemning a staggering array of life forms to extinction Yet perhaps a modest beginning could be made if a branch of ecological science were to dedicate itself to studying growth from the viewpoint and in the interests of non human forms of life the obverse of ecosystem services theory In practical terms conservationists could begin talking to other groups seeking reform from different perspectives indigenous communities are an obvious example From yet another starting point conservation organizations in Great Britain intervene regularly on questions of agrarian policy It is true that room for similar interventions in India where state involvement in agriculture takes very different forms is limited but a dialogue with the nascent organic farming movement might in time pave the way for more tangible suggestions But this depends upon the willingness of at least some conservationists to abandon an exclusive focus on practical effective action to invest in a process whose possibilities are distant and as yet undefined 3 There are two possible approaches to the environmental crisis of which climate change forms only the most pressing symptom One is to point out that the human race or much of it simply cannot survive in the long term by destroying the physical environment with the recklessness that we are doing A subset of this argument is that the impacts of the crisis are bound to fall disproportionately upon the poor and vulnerable The second viewpoint holds that we have no moral right to reshuffle nature on this gigantic scale and play God with other organisms and forms of life with whom we share the planet condemning them to extinction for our convenience There have been at least five mass extinctions in the millenia since life developed on earth a background against which human history is but an eye blink in time but this does not make our effect on the planet any less unprecedented since the sixth already well advanced is the work of a single species Personally speaking I belong to the second camp but human nature being what it is the anthropocentric approach seems the only plausible one In India the grounds for pessimism are many There is to begin with the very discourse of economic development the illusory hope of catching up with China in GDP growth and remaking the country finally into an economic and political superpower Historically speaking

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/2015/07/25/shashank-kela-some-notes-on-the-ecological-crisis-in-india/ (2016-05-02)
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  • George Monbiot: Soil – the crisis to beat them all? – Ecologise
    March 2015 16 February 2015 17 January 2015 10 December 2014 10 November 2014 10 October 2014 10 September 2014 11 August 2014 7 July 2014 5 June 2014 7 May 2014 2 April 2014 3 March 2014 4 February 2014 1 January 2014 2 December 2013 3 November 2013 2 October 2013 8 Upcoming Events Webinar on Groundtruthing at online event Groundtruthing gathers information that connects regulatory requirements with actual impacts development has on people Resource person Kanchi Kohli Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 12th May 2016 12th May 2016 Rainwater Harvesting Workshop at Hyderabad Understand and combat Hyderabad s water problems through rain water harvesting Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 15th May 2016 15th May 2016 Thought for Food at Palampur Himachal Pradesh Workshop on eating responsibly sharing strategies and tools for doing so Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 18th May 2016 22nd May 2016 Two short courses on Development at Azim Premji University Bangalore Designed for professionals working in various domains of development Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 24th May 2016 3rd June 2016 View All Events Special Features George Monbiot Soil the crisis to beat them all Written by Contributor Apr 2 2015 0 Comments War pestilence even climate change are trifles by comparison Destroy the soil and we all starve George Monbiot Imagine a wonderful world a planet on which there was no threat of climate breakdown no loss of freshwater no antibiotic resistance no obesity crisis no terrorism no war Surely then we would be out of major danger Sorry Even if everything else were miraculously fixed we re finished if we don t address an issue considered so marginal and irrelevant that you can go for months without seeing it in a newspaper It s literally and it seems metaphorically beneath us To judge by its absence from the media most journalists consider it unworthy of consideration But all human life depends on it We knew this long ago but somehow it has been forgotten As a Sanskrit text written in about 1500BC noted Upon this handful of soil our survival depends Husband it and it will grow our food our fuel and our shelter and surround us with beauty Abuse it and the soil will collapse and die taking humanity with it The issue hasn t changed but we have Landowners around the world are now engaged in an orgy of soil destruction so intense that

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/2015/04/02/george-monbiot-soil-the-crisis-to-beat-them-all/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Ecocide – Page 2 – Ecologise
    The Way Forward on Richard Heinberg An open letter to climate leaders Why Technology Cannot Adequately Address Climate Change Peak Oil India Exploring The Coming Energy Crisis And The Way Forward on How viable is renewable energy Why Technology Cannot Adequately Address Climate Change Peak Oil India Exploring The Coming Energy Crisis And The Way Forward on The climate challenge is deeper than technology Saral Sarkar on Cowspiracy The film that environmental organisations don t want you to see Bala on Subhash Palekar From farmer to national treasure RAMESHWAR NAYAK on Subhash Palekar From farmer to national treasure Hareesh on Subhash Palekar From farmer to national treasure H R Prakash on When communalists turns on environmentalists Ashok Kundapur on In spite of cool advertising electric cars also damage the environment Tags activism agrarian crisis agriculture air pollution alternatives Books capitalism carbon emissions China Climate Change coal corporate rule deforestation development ecological conflict economic growth education awareness energy extreme weather events food security fossil fuels future scenarios Gail Tverberg global economy green politics India inequality Kurt Cobb Narendra Modi government neoliberalism oil prices organic farming Paris climate talks peak oil Renewable energy resource depletion resource extraction Richard Heinberg rural India Sagar Dhara Sustainability Transition videos water crisis weather patterns Archives Archives Select Month May 2016 4 April 2016 51 March 2016 46 February 2016 31 January 2016 27 December 2015 31 November 2015 29 October 2015 19 September 2015 12 August 2015 13 July 2015 9 June 2015 11 May 2015 13 April 2015 12 March 2015 16 February 2015 17 January 2015 10 December 2014 10 November 2014 10 October 2014 10 September 2014 11 August 2014 7 July 2014 5 June 2014 7 May 2014 2 April 2014 3 March 2014 4 February 2014 1 January 2014 2 December

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/category/ecocide/page/2/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Report on Ecologise Camp 1 – Ecologise
    Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 18th May 2016 22nd May 2016 Two short courses on Development at Azim Premji University Bangalore Designed for professionals working in various domains of development Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 24th May 2016 3rd June 2016 View All Events Special Features Report on Ecologise Camp 1 Written by Shreekumar Aug 31 2015 1 Comment Letter from Shreekumar of Sangatya Commune who hosted the first Ecologise Camp We had a good beginning to the Ecologise programme with the first orientation camp held at Sangatya Commune Nakre Karkala The first session held after dinner on Friday August 14 2015 was meant for getting acquainted with one another After a welcome by Shreekumar on behalf of Sangatya the participants who came from a variety of backgrounds and from various parts of India introduced themselves in detail The schedule of events for the next two days was outlined field work in the morning a session for discussion and a session for screening films on Saturday Field work and discussion on Sunday There were 34 participants including 7 children in the first session and two more joined the next morning taking the total number to 36 The field work on both days included planting saplings digging trenches pruning gliricidia trees and mulching The physical work was accompanied by sharing of knowledge Usha s presence was of immense value Saturday s discussion session began with an introduction by Vijayendra and the screening of Village of the Watermills from Akira Kurosawa s film Dreams Sunday s discussion was based on a paper by Venkat On a Perspective for Renaissance of Agriculture At the end the participants made resolutions regarding their efforts to ecologise their lifestyles Listed below are the important things articulated during the discussions feel free to suggest additions modifications or deletions 1 The Earth is sick Healing it is of great urgency It is necessary to bring more people to the task of healing 2 Supporting the prevailing capitalist system directly or indirectly will make the planet more sick Therefore more and more people must be involved in building a sustainable local economy 3 In order to participate in healing the Earth people must connect with the land The peasantry must be nurtured rather than exploited 4 Planning of land use must be done at the level of watershed instead of individual land holdings People must have usufruct rights for land rather than ownership i e right to use not to own 5 Healing the Earth is in the common interest of all We must build communication channels surmounting caste and class barriers to face the crisis Opportunities in the unsustainable globalised economy are liberating to the rural working class because of the exploitative

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/2015/08/31/report-on-the-first-ecologise-workshop-2/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Shreekumar – Ecologise
    How viable is renewable energy Why Technology Cannot Adequately Address Climate Change Peak Oil India Exploring The Coming Energy Crisis And The Way Forward on The climate challenge is deeper than technology Saral Sarkar on Cowspiracy The film that environmental organisations don t want you to see Bala on Subhash Palekar From farmer to national treasure RAMESHWAR NAYAK on Subhash Palekar From farmer to national treasure Hareesh on Subhash Palekar From farmer to national treasure H R Prakash on When communalists turns on environmentalists Ashok Kundapur on In spite of cool advertising electric cars also damage the environment Tags activism agrarian crisis agriculture air pollution alternatives Books capitalism carbon emissions China Climate Change coal corporate rule deforestation development ecological conflict economic growth education awareness energy extreme weather events food security fossil fuels future scenarios Gail Tverberg global economy green politics India inequality Kurt Cobb Narendra Modi government neoliberalism oil prices organic farming Paris climate talks peak oil Renewable energy resource depletion resource extraction Richard Heinberg rural India Sagar Dhara Sustainability Transition videos water crisis weather patterns Archives Archives Select Month May 2016 4 April 2016 51 March 2016 46 February 2016 31 January 2016 27 December 2015 31 November 2015 29 October 2015 19 September 2015 12 August 2015 13 July 2015 9 June 2015 11 May 2015 13 April 2015 12 March 2015 16 February 2015 17 January 2015 10 December 2014 10 November 2014 10 October 2014 10 September 2014 11 August 2014 7 July 2014 5 June 2014 7 May 2014 2 April 2014 3 March 2014 4 February 2014 1 January 2014 2 December 2013 3 November 2013 2 October 2013 8 Upcoming Events Webinar on Groundtruthing at online event Groundtruthing gathers information that connects regulatory requirements with actual impacts development has on people Resource person

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/author/shreekumar/ (2016-05-02)
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  • First Ecologise Camp at Nakre, near Udupi, Karnataka – Ecologise
    2014 5 June 2014 7 May 2014 2 April 2014 3 March 2014 4 February 2014 1 January 2014 2 December 2013 3 November 2013 2 October 2013 8 Upcoming Events Webinar on Groundtruthing at online event Groundtruthing gathers information that connects regulatory requirements with actual impacts development has on people Resource person Kanchi Kohli Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 12th May 2016 12th May 2016 Rainwater Harvesting Workshop at Hyderabad Understand and combat Hyderabad s water problems through rain water harvesting Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 15th May 2016 15th May 2016 Thought for Food at Palampur Himachal Pradesh Workshop on eating responsibly sharing strategies and tools for doing so Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 18th May 2016 22nd May 2016 Two short courses on Development at Azim Premji University Bangalore Designed for professionals working in various domains of development Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 24th May 2016 3rd June 2016 View All Events Special Features First Ecologise Camp at Nakre near Udupi Karnataka Written by Ecologise Jul 28 2015 0 Comments The Ecologise Camp is a programme through which those living in cities can explore living in an ecologically more sensitive and sustainable manner Specifically it is a programme involving stay and work on an organic farm for varying periods as a volunteer The programme will be preceded by a weekend orientation workshop during which the participant may decide which farm they wish to work on and for how long The duration will vary according to the needs and land cycles of each farm There will be a few break periods during which participants can go home or travel It is possible that participants may not be in a position to commit for a longer period They can still attend the orientation workshop This workshop will also introduce the volunteer to practices one can incorporate in one s life to live a more healthy and a less resource intensive lifestyle During the programme the participants on an average will be involved for 4 hours of manual work per day They will have access to books and some relevant films and videos It is expected however that on the whole they will spend less time on phones mobiles and Internet than they have been used to in their city life Also connectivity is not very good on most farms Be prepared for digital detoxification The programme does not offer fellowships nor does it

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/2015/07/28/first-ecologise-camp-at-nakre-near-udupi-karnataka/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Bangalore meeting with Naresh of Transition Town Totnes – Ecologise
    national treasure Hareesh on Subhash Palekar From farmer to national treasure H R Prakash on When communalists turns on environmentalists Ashok Kundapur on In spite of cool advertising electric cars also damage the environment Tags activism agrarian crisis agriculture air pollution alternatives Books capitalism carbon emissions China Climate Change coal corporate rule deforestation development ecological conflict economic growth education awareness energy extreme weather events food security fossil fuels future scenarios Gail Tverberg global economy green politics India inequality Kurt Cobb Narendra Modi government neoliberalism oil prices organic farming Paris climate talks peak oil Renewable energy resource depletion resource extraction Richard Heinberg rural India Sagar Dhara Sustainability Transition videos water crisis weather patterns Archives Archives Select Month May 2016 3 April 2016 51 March 2016 46 February 2016 31 January 2016 27 December 2015 31 November 2015 29 October 2015 19 September 2015 12 August 2015 13 July 2015 9 June 2015 11 May 2015 13 April 2015 12 March 2015 16 February 2015 17 January 2015 10 December 2014 10 November 2014 10 October 2014 10 September 2014 11 August 2014 7 July 2014 5 June 2014 7 May 2014 2 April 2014 3 March 2014 4 February 2014 1 January 2014 2 December 2013 3 November 2013 2 October 2013 8 Upcoming Events Webinar on Groundtruthing at online event Groundtruthing gathers information that connects regulatory requirements with actual impacts development has on people Resource person Kanchi Kohli Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 12th May 2016 12th May 2016 Rainwater Harvesting Workshop at Hyderabad Understand and combat Hyderabad s water problems through rain water harvesting Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 15th May 2016 15th May 2016 Thought for Food at Palampur Himachal Pradesh Workshop on eating responsibly sharing strategies and tools for doing so Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 18th May 2016 22nd May 2016 Two short courses on Development at Azim Premji University Bangalore Designed for professionals working in various domains of development Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 24th May 2016 3rd June 2016 View All Events Special Features Bangalore meeting with Naresh of Transition Town Totnes Written by Ecologise Feb 24 2015 0 Comments Transition Towns is a world wide living experiment in how to shift our current system of unequal growth based consumption to one where all are living well in times of change and within our planetary boundaries The transition movement now has many examples of how local small scale

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/2015/02/24/bangalore-meeting-with-naresh-of-transition-town-totnes-26th-march/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Living in a World with Limited Resources – Sirsi, Feb 21 – Ecologise
    conflict economic growth education awareness energy extreme weather events food security fossil fuels future scenarios Gail Tverberg global economy green politics India inequality Kurt Cobb Narendra Modi government neoliberalism oil prices organic farming Paris climate talks peak oil Renewable energy resource depletion resource extraction Richard Heinberg rural India Sagar Dhara Sustainability Transition videos water crisis weather patterns Archives Archives Select Month May 2016 4 April 2016 51 March 2016 46 February 2016 31 January 2016 27 December 2015 31 November 2015 29 October 2015 19 September 2015 12 August 2015 13 July 2015 9 June 2015 11 May 2015 13 April 2015 12 March 2015 16 February 2015 17 January 2015 10 December 2014 10 November 2014 10 October 2014 10 September 2014 11 August 2014 7 July 2014 5 June 2014 7 May 2014 2 April 2014 3 March 2014 4 February 2014 1 January 2014 2 December 2013 3 November 2013 2 October 2013 8 Upcoming Events Webinar on Groundtruthing at online event Groundtruthing gathers information that connects regulatory requirements with actual impacts development has on people Resource person Kanchi Kohli Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 12th May 2016 12th May 2016 Rainwater Harvesting Workshop at Hyderabad Understand and combat Hyderabad s water problems through rain water harvesting Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 15th May 2016 15th May 2016 Thought for Food at Palampur Himachal Pradesh Workshop on eating responsibly sharing strategies and tools for doing so Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 18th May 2016 22nd May 2016 Two short courses on Development at Azim Premji University Bangalore Designed for professionals working in various domains of development Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 24th May 2016 3rd June 2016 View All Events Special Features Living in a World with Limited Resources Sirsi Feb 21 Written by Ecologise Feb 2 2015 0 Comments Date 21 Feb 2015 Time 3 00pm 6 00pm Venue A V Hall Don Bosco High School Sirsi Speakers Mansoor Khan and Sagar Dhara Growth is considered to be the fundamental characteristic of any healthy economic system This growth is fuelled by the easy availability of fossil fuel which is a limited natural resource formed over millions of years We have now reached a stage where half the available source of Oil has been consumed Exponential growth continues but the source of fuel that was driving it is half empty What will happen now What will happen to the economic systems

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/2015/02/02/living-in-a-world-with-limited-resources-sirsi-feb-21-2/ (2016-05-02)
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