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  • Culture & Communication – Page 2 – Ecologise
    35 Transition 47 VIDEOS 40 Most Popular Recent Comments Ashok Kundapur on Gail Tverberg The Physics of Energy and the Economy Can We Have Our Climate And Eat It Too Peak Oil India Exploring The Coming Energy Crisis And The Way Forward on Richard Heinberg An open letter to climate leaders Why Technology Cannot Adequately Address Climate Change Peak Oil India Exploring The Coming Energy Crisis And The Way Forward on How viable is renewable energy Why Technology Cannot Adequately Address Climate Change Peak Oil India Exploring The Coming Energy Crisis And The Way Forward on The climate challenge is deeper than technology Saral Sarkar on Cowspiracy The film that environmental organisations don t want you to see Bala on Subhash Palekar From farmer to national treasure RAMESHWAR NAYAK on Subhash Palekar From farmer to national treasure Hareesh on Subhash Palekar From farmer to national treasure H R Prakash on When communalists turns on environmentalists Ashok Kundapur on In spite of cool advertising electric cars also damage the environment Tags activism agrarian crisis agriculture air pollution alternatives Books capitalism carbon emissions China Climate Change coal corporate rule deforestation development ecological conflict economic growth education awareness energy extreme weather events food security fossil fuels future scenarios Gail Tverberg global economy green politics India inequality Kurt Cobb Narendra Modi government neoliberalism oil prices organic farming Paris climate talks peak oil Renewable energy resource depletion resource extraction Richard Heinberg rural India Sagar Dhara Sustainability Transition videos water crisis weather patterns Archives Archives Select Month May 2016 4 April 2016 51 March 2016 46 February 2016 31 January 2016 27 December 2015 31 November 2015 29 October 2015 19 September 2015 12 August 2015 13 July 2015 9 June 2015 11 May 2015 13 April 2015 12 March 2015 16 February 2015 17 January

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/category/culture-communication/page/2/ (2016-05-02)
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  • DEVELOPMENT – Page 2 – Ecologise
    least a good showdown s definitely expected Sarnath Banerjee s latest graphic novel envisions a similar war in the near future Fittingly the war s going to be fought over something as elemental as water Continue Reading NEWS UPDATE 83 Written by Ecologise Feb 17 2016 0 Comments Common Dreams reports A new analysis published in Science Advances journal reveals that global water scarcity is a far greater problem than previously thought affecting 4 billion people two thirds of the world s population Previous analyses looked at water scarcity at an annual scale and had found that water scarcity affected between 1 7 and 3 1 billion people Continue Reading Power in India radical pathways to local self rule Written by Contributor Feb 15 2016 0 Comments Ashish Kothari Pallav Das write in State of Power report People are recognizing that the current power dispensation is frozen in an intellectual paradigm defined by free market orthodoxy and will change only if confronted by worldviews such as swaraj or Radical Ecological Democracy India and the world needs that change in order to continue to thrive Continue Reading The world s forests will collapse if we don t learn to say no Written by Contributor Feb 15 2016 0 Comments An alarming new study has shown that the world s forests are not only disappearing rapidly but areas of core forest are vanishing even faster A tsunami of new roads dams power lines pipelines and other infrastructure is rapidly slicing into the world s last wild places opening them up to fragmentation poaching and other destructive activities Continue Reading Video Report The jungle gangs of Jharkhand Written by Contributor Feb 14 2016 0 Comments Kumar Sambhav Shrivastava reports Groups like JJMP and TSPC thrive on a levy collected from mining Jharkhand accounts for nearly a third of India s coal a quarter of its iron ore and 16 of copper In return the armed groups provide protection to mining companies and intimidate villagers to facilitate land acquisition for the companies Continue Reading Map shows India leads the world in ecological conflict Written by Contributor Feb 12 2016 0 Comments SciDev Net reports India Colombia and Nigeria have the most cases of conflict caused by climate change and environmental disputes according to a map of global ecological conflict The Environmental Justice Atlas shows that more than 200 conflicts in India are caused by ecological disputes and scarcities of basic resources such as water and forests Continue Reading NEWS UPDATE 82 Written by Ecologise Feb 8 2016 0 Comments Decision On GM Mustard Deferred Mining interests and tribal rights on collision course Former atomic energy regulator says India needs to pause nuclear plans Lesser water recorded in Indian reservoirs than last year Sikkim Organic Mission We Need To Dig Deeper Hydro dam boom threatens freshwater fish Radioactive Water From Fukushima Leaking Into the Pacific Continue Reading Why a Brazil tribe has the world s highest suicide rate Written by Contributor Jan 10 2016 0

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/category/development/page/2/ (2016-05-02)
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  • A Marathwada farmer’s wake-up call to India: try to understand why we die – Ecologise
    summers when the rivers dried up Consequently the traditional horticulture that depended on reserved water has steadily become extinct Farming economically unviable The question we confront every day is very fundamental How do we manage to stay alive Erratic weather and government policies have come together to dig our grave How can the government simply ignore the profession that is still pursued by half the Indian workforce The biggest concern in front of us right now is there is no ray of hope We do not get fair return on our investment and hard work Rising production costs and an unforgiving market price has made farming economically unviable The middleman adds to our miseries He knows we have no other option but to sell our yield to him The union in the market is dominated by traders and middlemen They have the might and the circumstances are ripe for them to exploit us We cannot even refuse to sell our product because the expenses and loans keep hovering over our heads We end up falling in the trap and the circle of losses goes on What alternatives do we have Most of the farmers are uneducated Many end up working as migrant labourers for half the year at sugarcane factories or travel out to cities and work on daily wage basis Eager to import penalty for export When we analyse the reasons behind the abysmal market cost for our crop the buck stops with the government s policies To give an example November end is the time when we sow the gram crop On 25 November last year the Indian government procured gram from Russia at Rs 53 per kilo The process of procurement went on till April by when we were ready with our yield But it had to be sold at a throwaway price because the government had already bought it from Russia Who told you to cultivate it Who asked you to depend on farming is the message the government seems to be giving us The chilling part is that imports are only increasing by the day The same thing has happened with pigeon peas which produce tur or arhar dal Instead of buying it from Indian farmers the government imported it from Australia and Indonesia at Rs 73 per kilo We would cultivate pigeon peas 12 months a year if we got that much But because of India s eagerness to import not many farmers in India are keen on cultivating it The result is in front of us the consumer had to buy it at Rs 200 per kilo The Market Support Price offered by the government is piddling and there are many hitches like storage limits government holidays unending paperwork wretched bureaucracy and so on Therefore the government support scheme hardly makes a tangible impact on the ground And when the government fails to procure the material from us the traders know we are helpless They latch on to the opportunity There are so called experts who opine that farming has become difficult to sustain It is no longer as viable as it used to be But in my opinion farming has been made unviable by government policies and an indifferent civil society The government has imposed a tax of 700 per ton on the export of onions It means if one of our farmers wants to sell one ton of onions to a trader from Japan he would first have to pay 700 to the government Obviously the farmer would want to cover that cost But then why would a trader from Japan purchase onions from us at an increased rate And once the exports are stalled the local trader jumps in and makes merry at our cost It leaves us wondering how to set up capital for the next season Left to fight our own battles It is not just the present government that deserves to be blamed The fact is that no government has done anything to protect us during the times of globalisation We had to compete with foreign entrants enjoying great subsidies in their respective countries The Indian farmer was never going to win that battle after economic liberalisation We were exposed to international market trends rupee devaluation etc Developed countries also opened up their economies but did not leave farmers to fight their own battles The Swaminathan Commission report has still not been enforced It is sitting with the government since 2007 The BJP government promised to implement it it was in their pre election agenda The vulnerable farmer quickly fell for it Narendra Modi s speeches and rallies in Marathwada struck a chord and everyone voted BJP in 2014 But the new government is proving to be as dishonest as the earlier one Experts come to inspect Last month a committee of a few expert members came to Marathwada from Delhi to inspect the drought We escorted them to a farm of pigeon peas The man who was supposed to be an expert could not even identify the raw pigeon pea Where are the pulses he asked me with bewilderment He did not even know the difference between the raw material and the pulses that we see in the market I was hoping to explain how the crop had dried up but after his question I decided against it Later on he could not recognise a raw pomegranate He wondered why the thing was green and not red Around 10 12 members of this expert panel had landed in Marathwada and they traveled in groups of two to various districts I assume the others were also as ignorant as the one I encountered in Beed because I heard instances of infuriated farmers heckling them In Beed s Georai taluka farmers did not allow this expert to get out of his car They lay down around the car leaving him deadlocked The drama went on for four hours until the police force came in On the one hand

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/2016/02/01/a-marathwada-farmers-wake-up-call-to-india/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Tribals in Odisha humour changing skies with mixed platters – Ecologise
    with long wispy spikes weighing heavy on the stalks While it might ve made for a pretty picture Loknath Nauri knew it would be a tough year More the density of the flowers the more severe the drought we face he says This was in March 2015 in the forests of southern Odisha Around the same time he saw something else that confirmed his feeling This time it was the Black hooded Oriole a small bird known as Bhartia in the local dialect The mouth of its nest was facing west We get monsoon rains from the west to the east The nest normally faces the east to avoid the shower but this year it was the reverse which meant that there wouldn t be much rain Nauri says Such cues about future events imbue the lives of the Kondh tribes of Odisha Nauri s farm at Korandiguda village in Rayagada district is looked over by the Niyamgiri hills the place where the Kondhs sent packing the bauxite mining project of multinational Vedanta Resources in 2013 He also belongs to the Kondh tribe but unlike those in Niyamgiri who indulge in slash and burn or shifting cultivation his forefathers learnt to work on permanent fields in the plains They regularly used manure ploughed irrigated removed weeds and mulched Even today they continue to grow crops on small untilled pockets of the lower hills called dongar But what keeps the tribals connected to their roots is the diversity their fields possess despite inroads made by commercial and chemical agriculture in the last 15 years Nauri grows 72 varieties of crop on his two acre farm mainly to reap the health and nutrient benefits of mixed cropping but in the last five years he has also realised that the farm has greater resilience to the changing skies The benefit of mixed cropping is that even in extreme weather events we get something out of the field Some crops work well in drought others in flood Compare this with mono cropping which won t even yield enough to eat in severe drought he explains At the COP21 Climate Change Conference held in Paris in December 2015 indigenous people from across the world like Nauri tried unsuccessfully to get recognition for the traditional knowledge they possess on how to deal with the looming climate crisis In Odisha too the tribals are fighting a battle against market forces Lure of commercial farming In 1994 95 cotton farmers from Andhra Pradesh came to Rayagada and introduced hybrid cotton luring tribals to the cash crop In 1995 a high yielding paddy variety was introduced Along came fertilizers and pesticides which were given free for a year Soon people were lured by the promise of bumper yields and a luxurious future Surjoamma of Daragadi village shows how finger millet and black gram seeds can be saved from pests if they are put together as they give different scents Domburu Toika was caught in the same whirlpool A middle

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/2016/01/26/tribals-in-odisha-humour-changing-skies-with-mixed-platters/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Weathering The Change ­- A Farmer’s Diary of 2015 – Ecologise
    I also heard in the news that rural families are beginning to migrate to Bangalore in search of work on construction sites because of the drought Most rural families working in cities return to the land during the four months of the monsoon to cultivate one rain fed crop This year the migration seems to have started much earlier with a failed monsoon crop With 60 of cultivable land in India being rain fed a good monsoon is critical to the survival of farmers Old timers in our area recall that no monsoon in recent memory has been as poor as this Our 35 feet deep well usually has over 25 feet of water at this time of the year But now I have to peer into the depths to spot the 3 4 feet of water at the bottom Our fields are being prepared but the pleasant July weather continues into August 25 August 2015 We spent yesterday and today transplanting the paddy seedlings in sunny weather Most years this would be done in pouring rain Rains are still very sporadic About 30 of the field was transplanted following the S R I System of Rice Intensification or Madagascar method as an experiment The SRI method requires less water than usual but should ve been transplanted when the seedlings are two weeks old Ours are five weeks old 15 September 2015 The Karnataka Government has now declared drought in 127 talukas in 27 of the 30 districts in the state We have just enough flowing water to keep our fields moist The rains have been scanty However there s a good chance of rains this week since the Ganesh Chaturthi festival is usually accompanied by a few days of rain 25 September 2015 Showers during the Ganesh Chaturthi week came as a big relief The fields have standing water now and are being weeded The Ganesh Chaturthi festival is officially the end of the monsoon By then the big rains would ve ended and from then on until Deepavali the rains taper off There are usually no rains after Deepavali Around Deepavali is also the harvest season Rains during the harvest are usually the last straw that breaks the proverbial camel s back in this case the farmer s The entire season s hard work can still be lost with a couple of heavy badly timed showers The farmer rests easy only once the paddy crop has been harvested and stored away The market price of his produce may still cause many sleepless nights but at least he ll have food for the rest of the year 15 October 2015 The field is dry when it should be flooded at this stage Credit George Varghese We ve had a long spell of sunny weather The water flowing through the field has reduced to a trickle The lower fields are dry and cracked The paddy plants there are stunted and looking very stressed The plants should be flowering soon and it is critical that there is standing water in the fields We installed our irrigation pump today It had been disconnected and packed away at the start of the monsoon Occasional irrigation is usually started in early summer to provide moisture for any of the young or more sensitive plants and trees This is the first time that we ve started irrigation before the end of the monsoon that too for a rice crop that would never ever have had to be irrigated 29 October 2015 There has been no power most of the day on most days We ve been running the electric pump at night to irrigate the field Some nights I ve had to run around in the dark to turn the electric pump on and off I remember reading somewhere that a large number of snakebites happen when farmers are wandering around in the dark to irrigate their fields during the odd hours of the night when power is available in rural places On my nocturnal trips to the field I stomp around harder to warn snakes off Half the field has been completely dry for the past three weeks There s not enough flowing water to reach the lower portions of the field Even when running the pump for two hours there s just enough water in the well to wet half the field And the next day the water in the field has drained or evaporated and it takes two more hours to flood the same half Water never makes it to the lower areas This calls for desperate measures We decide to install the pump in the stream adjoining our field I spent half the day today rigging it up Then there was no power all day to run it The pump was started only when power supply was restored in the evening Within an hour though it also starts raining These are the first rains we ve had all month Very welcome 3 November 2015 Brief showers during the past three evenings have given us enough water in the fields for now The paddy plants are all in the flowering and milky stage Availability of sufficient water is critical at this stage and the rains have been a boon Sitting in the field while running the electric motor to irrigate the paddy field I was thinking of the drastic increase in energy input for this year s crop In a normal year most of the energy that goes into raising the crop is from human labour and from the draught animal that ploughs the field For the past few years we ve also had to use a tiller to supplement the bullock power for ploughing Farmers that use chemical fertiliser add that extra component of energy inputs into their crop This year with all the irrigation that was required and the electric or diesel pumps that were pressed to service the energy inputs have increased many fold Electricity being free for irrigation

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/2016/01/19/weathering-the-change-%c2%ad-a-farmers-diary-of-2015/ (2016-05-02)
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  • George Varghese – Ecologise
    on The climate challenge is deeper than technology Saral Sarkar on Cowspiracy The film that environmental organisations don t want you to see Bala on Subhash Palekar From farmer to national treasure RAMESHWAR NAYAK on Subhash Palekar From farmer to national treasure Hareesh on Subhash Palekar From farmer to national treasure H R Prakash on When communalists turns on environmentalists Ashok Kundapur on In spite of cool advertising electric cars also damage the environment Tags activism agrarian crisis agriculture air pollution alternatives Books capitalism carbon emissions China Climate Change coal corporate rule deforestation development ecological conflict economic growth education awareness energy extreme weather events food security fossil fuels future scenarios Gail Tverberg global economy green politics India inequality Kurt Cobb Narendra Modi government neoliberalism oil prices organic farming Paris climate talks peak oil Renewable energy resource depletion resource extraction Richard Heinberg rural India Sagar Dhara Sustainability Transition videos water crisis weather patterns Archives Archives Select Month May 2016 4 April 2016 51 March 2016 46 February 2016 31 January 2016 27 December 2015 31 November 2015 29 October 2015 19 September 2015 12 August 2015 13 July 2015 9 June 2015 11 May 2015 13 April 2015 12 March 2015 16 February 2015 17 January 2015 10 December 2014 10 November 2014 10 October 2014 10 September 2014 11 August 2014 7 July 2014 5 June 2014 7 May 2014 2 April 2014 3 March 2014 4 February 2014 1 January 2014 2 December 2013 3 November 2013 2 October 2013 8 Upcoming Events Webinar on Groundtruthing at online event Groundtruthing gathers information that connects regulatory requirements with actual impacts development has on people Resource person Kanchi Kohli 12th May 2016 12th May 2016 Rainwater Harvesting Workshop at Hyderabad Understand and combat Hyderabad s water problems through rain water harvesting

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/author/george-varghese/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Winds of change – A view from Nersa – Ecologise
    in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 24th May 2016 3rd June 2016 View All Events Special Features Morvarid Fernandez Winds of change A view from Nersa Written by Contributor Jan 17 2016 0 Comments Morvarid Fernandez writes Our crops failed cattle graze the dry paddy straw and fields remain fallow because there is not enough water Bore wells are deeper the lines longer and the black blister bug usually a bane simply did not appear last year The monsoon of 2015 you ask But there just wasn t one Note This is the fourth installment of Weathering The Change a short series presenting a ground level perspective on the ongoing agricultural crisis particularly as it relates to changing weather patterns Read Part 1 Part 2 and Part 3 of the series Morvarid Fernandez It has been 35 years since we moved to Nersa a village in the Western Ghats in north Karnataka s Belgaum district 35 years conscientiously spent observing the weather among other things In each of those years the 7 th of June has always been significant to us because that was the day the monsoons arrived In the early years the weather seldom let us down and a predictable pre dawn drizzle was encouragement enough to steal a few more minutes in a warm comfortable bed Sadly recent years have more often than not thrown up dry sunny June days and the 7th has since lost its significance In an urban setting the weather and especially so the monsoons is like a moving backdrop but somewhat disconnected often only perceived through a partially open window or on the wet balcony of a city high rise The monsoon affects life in other ways of course delays in departure a pair of leaky wellingtons or an obstinate umbrella muddy floors and as seen in recent years some very serious flooding Usually though its appearance or disappearance is understated and city life can still go on That s not how things are in Nersa with all of us tilling the soil and living off the land Surrounded by the verdant jungles of the Western Ghats with an average yearly rainfall of 120 inches we are deeply associated with and wrapped up in the weather Weather in all its forms but especially the monsoons Consequently when the 7th of June dawns bright and sunny we have good reason to worry The climate has changed and so have our lives The summer of 2015 was a mild one Reason to celebrate you might think but mild summers have often resulted in failed monsoons The last week of May usually reveals the telltale signs of the approaching rains wild flowers make an appearance fireflies dance and everything around you is bursting with life A few early showers showed promise and in the farming community the euphoria and feeling of wellbeing that one always witnesses at the onset of the southwest monsoons was in evidence Fields were ploughed

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/2016/01/17/winds-of-change-a-view-from-nersa/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Alert: Global financial crash ahead? – Ecologise
    22nd May 2016 Two short courses on Development at Azim Premji University Bangalore Designed for professionals working in various domains of development Share this Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Google Opens in new window 24th May 2016 3rd June 2016 View All Events Special Features Reuters Alert Global financial crash ahead Written by Ecologise Jan 16 2016 1 Comment The Guardian reports Investors face a cataclysmic year where stock markets could fall by up to 20 and oil could slump to 16 a barrel the Royal Bank of Scotland have warned In a note to clients it said Sell everything except high quality bonds This is about return of capital not return on capital Sell everything ahead of stock market crash say RBS economists The Guardian Jan 12 Investors face a cataclysmic year where stock markets could fall by up to 20 and oil could slump to 16 a barrel economists at the Royal Bank of Scotland have warned In a note to its clients the bank said Sell everything except high quality bonds This is about return of capital not return on capital In a crowded hall exit doors are small It said the current situation was reminiscent of 2008 when the collapse of the Lehman Brothers investment bank led to the global financial crisis This time China could be the crisis point Also read Global markets turmoil echoes 2008 financial crisis warns George Soros China s avalanche stokes fears of global recession Swaminathan S Aiyar The Times of India Jan 17 An avalanche of dollars exiting China threatens to smother all emerging markets EMs including India and cause a global recession Almost 600 billion have exited China in the last six months a mammoth 100 billion per month This would have emptied the forex reserves of almost any other country but China still has 3 3 trillion left However it cannot afford a continuing outflow at this rate The Deflation Monster Has Arrived Chris Martenson PeakProsperity com Jan 15 As we ve been warning for quite a while too long for my taste the world s grand experiment with debt has come to an end And it s now unraveling While there may be a market rescue that provide some relief in the near term looking at the next few years we will experience this as a time of unprecedented financial market turmoil political upheaval and social unrest The losses will be staggering Markets are going to crash wealth will be transferred from the unwary to the well connected and life for most people will get harder as measured against the recent past Albert Edwards Hits Peak Pessimism S P Will Fall 75 Global Recession Looms Zero Hedge Jan 13 2016 I believe the Fed and its promiscuous fraternity of central banks have created the conditions for another debacle every bit as large as the 2008 Global Financial Crisis I believe

    Original URL path: http://www.ecologise.in/2016/01/16/digest-global-financial-crash-ahead/ (2016-05-02)
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